'That not a heart which in his level came Could scape the hail of his all-hurting aim, Showing fair nature is both kind and tame; And, veil'd in them, did win whom he would maim: Against the thing he sought he would exclaim; When he most burned in heart-wish'd luxury, He preach'd pure maid and prais'd cold chastity.

'Thus merely with the garment of a Grace The naked and concealed fiend he cover'd, That the unexperienc'd gave the tempter place, Which, like a cherubin, above them hover'd. Who, young and simple, would not be so lover'd? Ay me! I fell, and yet do question make What I should do again for such a sake.

'O, that infected moisture of his eye, O, that false fire which in his cheek so glow'd, O, that forc'd thunder from his heart did fly, O, that sad breath his spongy lungs bestow'd, O, all that borrow'd motion, seeming ow'd, Would yet again betray the fore-betray'd, And new pervert a reconciled maid.'

A Lover's Complaint

William Shakespeare Plays

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William Shakespeare
Classic Literature Library

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