Gre. No doubt but he hath got a quiet catch: But now Baptista, to your yonger daughter, Now is the day we long haue looked for, I am your neighbour, and was suter first

Tra. And I am one that loue Bianca more Then words can witnesse, or your thoughts can guesse

Gre. Yongling thou canst not loue so deare as I

Tra. Gray-beard thy loue doth freeze

Gre. But thine doth frie, Skipper stand backe, 'tis age that nourisheth

Tra. But youth in Ladies eyes that florisheth

Bap. Content you gentlemen, I wil co[m]pound this strife 'Tis deeds must win the prize, and he of both That can assure my daughter greatest dower, Shall haue my Biancas loue. Say signior Gremio, what can you assure her? Gre. First, as you know, my house within the City Is richly furnished with plate and gold, Basons and ewers to laue her dainty hands: My hangings all of tirian tapestry: In Iuory cofers I haue stuft my crownes: In Cypres chests my arras counterpoints, Costly apparell, tents, and Canopies, Fine Linnen, Turky cushions bost with pearle, Vallens of Venice gold, in needle worke: Pewter and brasse, and all things that belongs To house or house-keeping: then at my farme I haue a hundred milch-kine to the pale, Sixe-score fat Oxen standing in my stalls, And all things answerable to this portion. My selfe am strooke in yeeres I must confesse, And if I die to morrow this is hers, If whil'st I liue she will be onely mine

Tra. That only came well in: sir, list to me, I am my fathers heyre and onely sonne, If I may haue your daughter to my wife, Ile leaue her houses three or foure as good Within rich Pisa walls, as any one Old Signior Gremio has in Padua, Besides, two thousand Duckets by the yeere Of fruitfull land, all which shall be her ioynter. What, haue I pincht you Signior Gremio? Gre. Two thousand Duckets by the yeere of land, My Land amounts not to so much in all: That she shall haue, besides an Argosie That now is lying in Marcellus roade: What, haue I choakt you with an Argosie? Tra. Gremio, 'tis knowne my father hath no lesse Then three great Argosies, besides two Galliasses And twelue tite Gallies, these I will assure her, And twice as much what ere thou offrest next

Gre. Nay, I haue offred all, I haue no more, And she can haue no more then all I haue, If you like me, she shall haue me and mine

Tra. Why then the maid is mine from all the world By your firme promise, Gremio is out-vied

Bap. I must confesse your offer is the best, And let your father make her the assurance, Shee is your owne, else you must pardon me: If you should die before him, where's her dower? Tra. That's but a cauill: he is olde, I young

Gre. And may not yong men die as well as old? Bap. Well gentlemen, I am thus resolu'd, On sonday next, you know My daughter Katherine is to be married: Now on the sonday following, shall Bianca Be Bride to you, if you make this assurance: If not, to Signior Gremio: And so I take my leaue, and thanke you both. Enter.

Gre. Adieu good neighbour: now I feare thee not: Sirra, yong gamester, your father were a foole To giue thee all, and in his wayning age Set foot vnder thy table: tut, a toy, An olde Italian foxe is not so kinde my boy. Enter.

Tra. A vengeance on your crafty withered hide, Yet I haue fac'd it with a card of ten: 'Tis in my head to doe my master good: I see no reason but suppos'd Lucentio Must get a father, call'd suppos'd Vincentio, And that's a wonder: fathers commonly Doe get their children: but in this case of woing, A childe shall get a sire, if I faile not of my cunning. Enter.

The Taming of the Shrew Page 17

William Shakespeare Plays

Free Books in the public domain from the Classic Literature Library ©

William Shakespeare
Classic Literature Library

All Pages of This Book