Tra. And you sir, you are welcome, Trauaile you farre on, or are you at the farthest? Ped. Sir at the farthest for a weeke or two, But then vp farther, and as farre as Rome, And so to Tripolie, if God lend me life

Tra. What Countreyman I pray? Ped. Of Mantua

Tra. Of Mantua Sir, marrie God forbid, And come to Padua carelesse of your life

Ped. My life sir? how I pray? for that goes hard

Tra. 'Tis death for any one in Mantua To come to Padua, know you not the cause? Your ships are staid at Venice, and the Duke For priuate quarrel 'twixt your Duke and him, Hath publish'd and proclaim'd it openly: 'Tis meruaile, but that you are but newly come, You might haue heard it else proclaim'd about

Ped. Alas sir, it is worse for me then so, For I haue bils for monie by exchange From Florence, and must heere deliuer them

Tra. Wel sir, to do you courtesie, This wil I do, and this I wil aduise you. First tell me, haue you euer beene at Pisa? Ped. I sir, in Pisa haue I often bin, Pisa renowned for graue Citizens

Tra. Among them know you one Vincentio? Ped. I know him not, but I haue heard of him: A Merchant of incomparable wealth

Tra. He is my father sir, and sooth to say, In count'nance somewhat doth resemble you

Bion. As much as an apple doth an oyster, & all one

Tra. To saue your life in this extremitie, This fauor wil I do you for his sake, And thinke it not the worst of all your fortunes, That you are like to Sir Vincentio. His name and credite shal you vndertake, And in my house you shal be friendly lodg'd, Looke that you take vpon you as you should, You vnderstand me sir: so shal you stay Til you haue done your businesse in the Citie: If this be court'sie sir, accept of it

Ped. Oh sir I do, and wil repute you euer The patron of my life and libertie

Tra. Then go with me, to make the matter good, This by the way I let you vnderstand, My father is heere look'd for euerie day, To passe assurance of a dowre in marriage 'Twixt me, and one Baptistas daughter heere: In all these circumstances Ile instruct you, Go with me to cloath you as becomes you.

Exeunt.

The Taming of the Shrew Page 26

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