Lu. Madam: dinner is ready: and your father staies

Iu. Well, let vs goe

Lu. What, shall these papers lye, like Tel-tales here? Iu. If you respect them; best to take them vp

Lu. Nay, I was taken vp, for laying them downe. Yet here they shall not lye, for catching cold

Iu. I see you haue a months minde to them

Lu. I (Madam) you may say what sights you see; I see things too, although you iudge I winke

Iu. Come, come, wilt please you goe.

Exeunt.

Scoena Tertia.

Enter Antonio and Panthino. Protheus.

Ant. Tell me Panthino, what sad talke was that, Wherewith my brother held you in the Cloyster? Pan. 'Twas of his Nephew Protheus, your Sonne

Ant. Why? what of him? Pan. He wondred that your Lordship Would suffer him, to spend his youth at home, While other men, of slender reputation Put forth their Sonnes, to seeke preferment out. Some to the warres, to try their fortune there; Some, to discouer Islands farre away: Some, to the studious Vniuersities; For any, or for all these exercises, He said, that Protheus, your sonne, was meet; And did request me, to importune you To let him spend his time no more at home; Which would be great impeachment to his age, In hauing knowne no trauaile in his youth

Ant. Nor need'st thou much importune me to that Whereon, this month I haue bin hamering. I haue consider'd well, his losse of time, And how he cannot be a perfect man, Not being tryed, and tutord in the world: Experience is by industry atchieu'd, And perfected by the swift course of time: Then tell me, whether were I best to send him? Pan. I thinke your Lordship is not ignorant How his companion, youthfull Valentine, Attends the Emperour in his royall Court

Ant. I know it well

Pan. 'Twere good, I thinke, your Lordship sent him (thither, There shall he practise Tilts, and Turnaments; Heare sweet discourse, conuerse with Noble-men, And be in eye of euery Exercise Worthy his youth, and noblenesse of birth

Ant. I like thy counsaile: well hast thou aduis'd: And that thou maist perceiue how well I like it, The execution of it shall make knowne; Euen with the speediest expedition, I will dispatch him to the Emperors Court

Pan. To morrow, may it please you, Don Alphonso, With other Gentlemen of good esteeme Are iournying, to salute the Emperor, And to commend their seruice to his will

The Two Gentlemen of Verona Page 07

William Shakespeare Plays

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